Posts Tagged ‘Franz Kafka’

French and Québécois online reviews, part three

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

“It’s therefore a novel about the saving power of the imagination… an imagination that constitutes an abyss into which you must throw yourself in order to survive… Every paragraph is like the pitch for a tale that Kafka or Burroughs could have written, a dream forever mutating into nightmare.”

— Pierre, “Dans le style du napalm”

Mauvaise Chimie >

La maison des épreuves is a book that obliges readers to leave their passivity, a sometimes disturbing book with a complicated construction. That being said, Jason Hrivnak’s first novel has something obsessive about it… One musn’t just read La maison des épreuves, one must take total possession of it.

— Anaïs Orieul, “10 livres à lire absolument en attendant le printemps”

Terrafemina >

“We’re plunged without cease into situations that are unsound, discomfiting, designed, we understand in the end, to put a name to pain, to put a name to that which should not be… Expect to have plenty of dreams at night in which Hrivnak’s words rock you to sleep…”

— Elizabeth Lord, “La Maison des épreuves de Jason Hrivnak: un beau cauchemar”

Les Méconnus >

La maison des épreuves is a book of the dead for the use of the living, the gaze of Orpheus toward a suicidal Eurydice… A masterpiece of literary game-craft.”

— Lucien Raphmaj, “Et Fiona avec vous au labyrinthe descendue…”

Latérature >

National press coverage in France

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

“The embryonic narratives formed into black and venomous little tales, recalling those of Edgar Poe… Like all new works, it does not subscribe to a genre but creates one if its own, a form never before seen, a precedent, perhaps, in the history of literature and it therefore seems necessary to me that it exists, that it can be read, even imitated.”

— Alice Zéniter, “Traduire, dit-elle”

Le Monde (paywall) >

“The first ordeal in this House is the act of reading. It presents us with a deforming (or true) mirror that reflects what we are determined not to see. But this atmosphere, which comes from Sade, from Kafka, from the great gothic and surrealist novels, engages us from the very start.”

— Alain Nicolas, “Quel cauchemar êtes-vous?”

l’Humanité >

“There is something astonishing in La Maison des Épreuves.”

— Mathieu Lindon, “Jeux Pernicieux Inc.”

Libération >